Life & Letters

Correspondence

About this Item

Title: John Burroughs to Walt Whitman, 29 October 1882

Date: October 29, 1882

Editorial note: The annotation, "see notes June 18 1888," is in the hand of Horace Traubel.

Source: Transcribed from digital images or a microfilm reproduction of the original item. For a description of the editorial rationale behind our treatment of the correspondence, see our statement of editorial policy.

Location: The Charles E. Feinberg Collection of the Papers of Walt Whitman, 1839–1919, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Whitman Archive ID: loc.01142

Contributors to digital file: Stefan Schoeberlein, Kirsten Clawson, Eder Jaramillo, and Nicole Gray



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West Park
Oct 29. 82

Dear Walt.

I was much disturbed by your card. I had been thinking of you as probably enjoying these superb autumn days down in the country at Kirkwood, & here you are wretched & sick at home. I trust you are better now. You need a change. I dearly wish that as soon as you are well enough you would come up here & spend a few weeks with us. We could have a good time here in my bark-covered shanty & in knocking about the country. Let me know that you will come.

The "Specimen Days &c" came all right. I do not like the last part of the title; it brings me up with such a short turn. I have read most of the new matter & like it of course. I have not seen any notices of the book yet. I have just recd an English book—Familiar Studies of men & books—by Stevenson with an essay upon you in it. But it does not amount to much. He has the American vice of smartness & flippancy. I do not think you would care for the piece.

I am bank examining nowadays, but shall be free again pretty soon.

O'Connor writes me that he is going to pub his Tribune letters in a pamphlet, with some other matter; I am glad to hear it. He draws blood every time.

I fear poor old Alcott will not rally; indeed he may be dead now. I had a pleasant letter from him the other day. I had sent him a crate of Concord grapes.

I am very stupid to-day. For the past two weeks my head has been ground between the upper & nether millstone of bank ledgers & it is sore. We are all well. Julian is a fine large boy. Drop me a card when you receive this; also write me when you will come up.

With much love
John Burroughs


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