Life & Letters

Correspondence

About this Item

Title: Walt Whitman to Josiah Child, 17 December 1882

Date: December 17, 1882

Source: Transcribed from digital images or a microfilm reproduction of the original item. For a description of the editorial rationale behind our treatment of the correspondence, see our statement of editorial policy.

Notes for this letter were derived from Walt Whitman, The Correspondence, ed. Edwin Haviland Miller, 6 vols. (New York: New York University Press, 1961–1977).

Location: The Charles E. Feinberg Collection of the Papers of Walt Whitman, 1839–1919, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Whitman Archive ID: loc.01270

Contributors to digital file: Stefan Schoeberlein, Nima Najafi Kianfar, Eder Jaramillo, and Nicole Gray



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Camden New Jersey U S America1
Dec: 17 '82—

Real thanks for your thought & deed in sending me "Nineteenth Century" criticism—you have probably seen my new prose jumble, "Specimen Days" but I forward you, (same mail with this) a special family copy different from the general edition—The other copy accompanying it, would you do me the favor to see if you can find G C Macaulay, the writer of criticism in the N C—& send to him?2 I am now well again as usual—


Walt Whitman


Notes:

1. This post card is addressed: Josiah Child | at Trübner & Co's: | 57 & 59 Ludgate Hill | London England. It is postmarked: Camden | (?) | 17 | 8 PM | N.J.; E 7 | London (?) | Ja (?) | 83. [back]

2. Macaulay's review of Leaves of Grass appeared in The Nineteenth Century, 12 (December 1882), 903–918. Despite some reservations, Macaulay's was a fair and judicious essay; he particularly admired "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking" and "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd." [back]


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