Life & Letters

Correspondence

About this Item

Title: J. Richardson to Walt Whitman, 8 September 1880

Date: September 8, 1880

Source: Transcribed from digital images or a microfilm reproduction of the original item. For a description of the editorial rationale behind our treatment of the correspondence, see our statement of editorial policy.

Location: The Thomas Biggs Harned Collection of the Papers of Walt Whitman, 1842–1937, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Whitman Archive ID: loc.05555

Contributors to digital file: Blake Bronson-Bartlett, Elizabeth Lorang, Stefan Schöberlein, and Nicole Gray



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Citadal
sept..8.1880

Dear friend

I recieved youre letter and waus glad to hear that you enjoyed youre trip up to london and am also glad you like canada i wish the english goverment would give it to the states i am sure it would be much better for everybody in it as their would be a good deal livelier times than their is and lots of work i am having good times now i am changed from the gunners to the cavarly and am learning to ride and the sword exercise and it is splendid fun we look so awkard on horse back some hanging on to the horsees neck and others on to the saddle and the rideing master will chase them round the school till they leave go or else tumble off i have not got a tumble yet thanks to my horse fer he is an easy goer. the french man of war waus here when you where here well since she went away. their has been an english one here and we have had a splendid time with the sallors they are such jolly fellows they where up to the citadel every night singind and dancing and they are just the fellos that can sing to i recived the papers that you sent to me and read all the accounts of youre selif and think you are right at home their i think you better settle down in canada in this letter isend you you one of my photos and that waus what kept me from writing i waus wating for it. i would like to spend a couple of weeks in london and look through the asylum i have never been through one yet. one of the little boats with the man of war waus out at the zulu war and fetched always to england now i hope you will excuse my bad writing and spelling for my sister give me a tallking to for my spelling the last time she wrote i got a letter from mother to day and she told me that my brother had broke his arm but it is getting along all right mow he his such a little fellow only 8. years old and nou i guess this is all i have got to say and i hope you are well as this leaves me

yours truly
J Richardson


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