Commentary

Disciples


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Sunday, June 1, 1890

     10.10 A.M. Down to W.'s with Harned. Bucke already there, as arranged for with me. Had come in to say good-bye. W. appeared to be what Bucke called "all tuckered out." Voice hoarse, eyes rather heavy, in a state of general lassitude. Still, he reported himself "all right," spoke of last night as "a great night"—and "Bob was our feather: he beat the record." Bucke remarked to me [afterward?] that nothing better manifests W.'s weak condition than this result (passivity) of last night's event.


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     We talked of many things—W. of the dinner mainly—called it "the greatest happening of a line of happenings" &c. His farewell to Bucke very manly, quiet, pathetic. To me "Good-bye for the present, boy."

     He has not abandoned the idea of getting up cards for the guests— "We will talk that over," he said to me; but to have got them up yesterday would have involved too much of a hurry—I cannot be urged." There was a reasonably good account of the dinner in the Press, which W. had read—better in the Inquirer. Times account accurate in the main, but brief.

     After Bucke had left W.'s with me, we went to town together—the Dr. to his hotel, I to a meeting—coming together again at 12.20 at Broad street depot, Bush there and going to New York with Bucke.

     A good-bye that touched me—for I feel it will not be long before B. is summoned for the last act.


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