Commentary

Disciples


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Tuesday, June 10, 1890

     5.40 P.M. W. reading Scott—poems. Very much better today, though not out. Weather warmer. Warren brought in a couple of letters and a paper while I was there. W. read the former, one of them being from Bucke. "Doctor writes, but nothing new. Still speaks of 'Harrington,' which Mrs. O'Connor

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gave him—is reading it."
Was it true, as Bucke put it to me— "I am more and more convinced that O'Connor gave up all for Leaves of Grass." W. was dubious. "O'Connor had a great deal more individuality—his own self-ness—than even Doctor knows. Yet in O'Connor there was doubt, too—doubt of his own performances—and this was a deterrent force."

     Expects Kennedy here "after the 7th—he shakes off his shackles on that date." Left with him Scribner's containing the 2nd. instalment of Bartlett on Millet. "Everything about Millet draws me—is a magnet. Even the simple ingredients, out of which came such wonderful results."

     Gave me a pamphlet by Schelling, containing two essays on Browning, which he had "looked into but not read."


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