Commentary

Disciples


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Sunday, October 12, 1890

     8:10 P.M. W. in his bedroom. Overcoat on, collar up. Not cold, yet damp and raw. Had not been able to get out. Anne Montgomerie went there with me. W. wished to go downstairs, but I advised him not. "I have just come up, it is true," he said. Reading paper, on bed a "syndicate" advertisement—English—a beautiful four-page sheet probably 20 X 10 inches or 12—printed in red and black on paper that had the feel of parchment almost. W. much admired it. "If I had not known it otherwise I should have guessed that was English printing."

     Had seen advertisements in paper today—Press. Also in Times and Inquirer. Expressed himself as satisfied. Advertisement in yesterday's Post, too. All the posters I have so far seen are misjoined—the "testimonial," etc. appearing in middle instead of top.


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     W. spoke again of his "content with the way things are going." As to his appearing on stage, "I feel as if I must say a few words—I don't know what about or how—but the spirit moves me to the idea that something belongs from me. But I am loth to appear on the stage. But no matter: I rest it in your hands and Baker's. Let it suffice for me that you, hearing my protest, are at liberty to use it however you choose, here or hereafter."

      "More and more," he said, "I am drawn to the Colonel's magnificent spirit: it is unprecedented. Oh! for O'Connor to see it all!"

     Chubb spoke today before the Ethical Society—on matters of "Decay in Life and Thought"—both quoting W. and referring to him warmly. Quoted some recent outpouring of Coventry Patmore, that it was an ill sign of the encroachments and vulgarity of democracy that men themselves current on art and literature should rank Walt Whitman as a man of high genius. This is as I understood Chubb. Chubb on the other hand argued it as one of our hopes that this love was entertained, etc. I recited all this to W., who said he had not heard of Patmore's deliverance, but was greatly interested to know of it and of Chubb's exceptions. Chubb could not come over, but possibly will next Sunday. I tried to persuade him that he should stay over the Ingersoll address next week. Had never heard Ingersoll. Would like to.


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