In Whitman's Hand

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About this Item

Title: How would it do

Creators: Walt Whitman, Unknown

Date: Undated

Source: The Charles E. Feinberg Collection of the Papers of Walt Whitman, 1839–1919, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Transcribed from digital images of the original item.

Whitman Archive ID: loc.03413

Notes written on manuscript: On surface 2, in an unknown hand: "1"; on surface 4, in an unknown hand: "3"

Contributors to digital file: Lauren Grewe, Ty Alyea, Nicole Gray, and Matt Cohen



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How would it do to change the names of New Jersey, Rhode Island, New Hampshire?


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The State of Narragansett Bay


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the sea air, the ^uniform climate cool summer,

commerce extensive —the cotton, woolen, iron & lace manufac‑
tures—


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Connecticut


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large manufactures of clocks, cotton goods, and gutta‑percha,


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shad fishery of Connecticut river is quite large


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Middle States

New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, & Maryland

Alleghany Mts Cattskills


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Valley of the Mohawk


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Great lakes & small lakes,


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Susquehannah river


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animals—bear, wolf, moose, (in the north,)


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minerals—iron, coal, & marble—


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Wheat andapples, peaches, pears & grapes


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"The vast and numerous mines— the exhaustless stores of iron and coal."


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The Empire State

put this name instead of New York

The population, Wealth & commerce


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Mts, the Mohegan Mts (also the Katskills)

River—the Hudson


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"the wild-fowl and fish of Paumanok"


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"Mannahatta Bay."


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the falls of Niagara,— ^The amplitude, and ease, and perfect proportions of the scenery— the broad river ^stream of the inland seas pouring over the ledge, and falling down a striking a one hundred and sixty feet below,


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The railroads—


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The Mannahatta that's it the Manna‑
hatta

—the mast‑hemmed— the egg in the nest of the beautiful bays—the my city—ma femme—O never forgotten [by?] me


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Maine


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Fish—Codfish mackarel herring salmon

lumber) white pine spruce red oak beech Hemlock, maple ash

☞ limestone (burned for lime plentiful

Timber staples—boards, staves, wood, fish, beef, lime, ice

Shipping (☞ Is a great ship‑building state—the first in the union—builds one third of all the U.S. ship building

Lumbering—


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Merri mac state

New Hampshire "granite state"


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the white pine sometimes 200 ft high, and 6 ft in diameter


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Granite is found in all parts of the state


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apples, pears, plums, cherries


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cotton factories


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India Maize, wheat, rye, cattle,


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Vermont


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—mainly grazing springs and brooks are numerous


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wool is a staple‑product


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maple sugar is "numerous"


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Massachu‑
setts

Massachusetts Bay—historical

—Commerce "The commerce of Massachu‑
setts, the factories, the perfect cultivation of the land—the inventions schools, the benevolent institutions, the curious inventions

The Massachusetts aesthetic ^ennuyed, with always concealed fires, unpersuadable, the ^unmasterable, the originatorress of The States, an [illegible] a divine title, well‑deserved,


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Empire State

the 12,000 public sko schools—


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Salt,

6,000,000 bushels annually in Onondaga Salt springs

the great railroads and canals——the hundreds Mannahatta—the population and wealth— —the superb scenery— the interior lakes—
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The Sea‑side State, (New Jersey,

fruit, vegetables —Passaic the falls of the Passaic—fisheries


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Pennsylvania—

—valley of the Sus —the Susquehannah river —Alleghany Mts—in the forests the wild catalpa and the laurel‑tree —Staples—wheat & maize the great mines of iron & coal "the Keystone State"


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Southern states

theAnimals, the alligator, the rattlesnake, & moccasin‑snake— the Humming birds, the turkey‑
buzzard


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the yellow‑pine (producing tar pitch & turpentine
" live oak
(magnolia
' cypress
(orange
" graceful palmetto,
lemon
fig
" scented bay tree

Staples—cotton, sugar, rice, & tobacco

—fruits—oranges lemons & figs —the sweet potato and the yam


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Rivers

Roanoke—500 length
Savannah 600 miles
Altamaha 500
Alabama 500

the sluggish rivers, flowing over the sands, or through swamps

warm land, —sunny land the fiery land, the rich‑blooded land, in hot quick‑melted land, my land—land of impulse and of love


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—the sugar‑maple—in western Virginia


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^The territory plenteous area— The three millions of square miles—the diverse spread

The valley of the Mississippi—the Atlantic slope slope of to the Eastern sSea—that to the Western sSea—that to the great South Gulf.
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Georgia

Cotton and rice—(staples) the olive, the orange, indigo, cotton


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(in the woods) Oak, pine, hickory, cedar


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(animals) deer, wild turkeys, (the alligator)


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The rich luxuriant forests, overhung charged with misleto— the ^odor, density, gloom, ^—the awful natural stillness, — no




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