In Whitman's Hand

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About this Item

Title: Amos T. Akerman to George H. Wright, 13 December 1871

Date: December 13, 1871

Source: Transcribed from digital images or a microfilm reproduction of the original item. For a description of the editorial rationale behind our treatment of the correspondence, see our statement of editorial policy.

Location: National Archives and Records Administration

Whitman Archive ID: nar.03527

Contributors to digital file: Elizabeth Lorang, John Schwaninger, and Anthony Dreesen



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Dec. 13, 1871.

Hon. George H. Wright,

U.S. Senate.

Sir:

I have received your letter of the 27th ult. suggesting an increase of the compensation of the Hon. Ralph P. Lowe, Assistant District Attorney of Iowa.

I have carefully considered all that you say in relation to the value of Judge Lowe's services, and deem it fortunate that the Government has been able to secure the services of so able a man. But I could not raise his compensation without setting a precedent that would be inconvenient, and perhaps unjust. There is no District with business no greater than that of Iowa in which the Assistant is paid a larger sum than the present compensation of Judge Lowe; and if his should be increased I should be obliged to increase that of similar officers in other Districts, or subject this Department to the charge of partiality.

And I do not feel at liberty to order compensation for his services prior to his appointment. I have no doubt that, in his case, the services were rendered in good faith, and were beneficial to the Government. But it is my rule to direct compensation for no unauthorized services. Manifest and serious abuses would grow out of a different rule.

Very respectfully, &c.

A. T. Akerman,

Attorney General.


increased compensation declined


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