In Whitman's Hand

Poetry Manuscripts

Table of Contents
Color Key

     
[Leaf 1 recto]
245
2485

[The Great Laws do not treasure chips]

The Great Laws do not treasure chips, and or
        stick for the odd cent;
I am of the same fashion—for I am their
        friend.—
 
I rate myself high—I receive no small sums;
I must have my full price—whoever enjoys me.
 
I feel satisfied my visit will be worthy of me
        and of my Hosts and Favorites;
I leave it to them how to receive me.—
 
[Leaf 1 verso]  

[The teeth grit]

[Begin hashmark section]
[The teeth grit?] [about three words cut away] [palms of the?]
        hands are cut by the naturned in nails
St He It ^The man falls struggling and foaming to the ground,
        though he begs and barters there.— so cooly.—
 
I remember when I visited the Asylum and they
        showed me their most smeared and slobbering
        idiot,
Yet I knew for my for my consolation, of the great
        laws that emptied and broke my my brothers
[about six words cut away]
[End hashmark section]

Date
This manuscript was probably composed between 1850 and 1855, when Whitman was writing the poems of the first edition of Leaves of Grass.
Editorial note
"[The Great Laws do not treasure chips]" contains draft lines that appeared in a revised form in the eleventh poem of the first (1855) edition of Leaves of Grass. The poem was ultimately titled "Who Learns My Lesson Complete?" "[hands are cut by the]" contains draft lines that appeared in a revised form in the sixth poem of the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass. The poem was ultimately titled "Faces."
Location
[The Great Laws do not treasure chips] MS 4to 9  |  Trent Collection of Whitmaniana, Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library.
Whitman Archive ID
duk.00264

Comments?

Published Works | In Whitman's Hand | Life & Letters | Commentary | Resources | Pictures & Sound

Support the Archive | About the Archive

Distributed under a Creative Commons License. Ed Folsom & Kenneth M. Price, editors.