In Whitman's Hand

Manuscripts

About this Item

Title: After all is said and done

Creator: Walt Whitman

Date: Early 1855 or before

Whitman Archive ID: duk.00797

Source: Trent Collection of Whitmaniana, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University. Transcribed from digital images of the original. For a description of the editorial rationale behind our treatment of the manuscripts, see our statement of editorial policy.

Editorial note: The second paragraph of this prose manuscript appeared in a slightly altered form in the first poem of the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, the poem ultimately titled "Song of Myself." The date must therefore be in or before 1855.

Related item: On the back of this manuscript leaf is a draft of poetic lines about touch related to sections 28 to 30 in the final version of "Song of Myself."

Contributors to digital file: Nicole Gray, Janel Cayer, Kevin McMullen, Kenneth M. Price, and Brett Barney



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[Page image: http://www.whitmanarchive.org/manuscripts/figures/duk.00007.002.jpg]

Allfter all that can be is said and done in the way of argument, the innumerable it the whole amount to a means but a is a makes raises but bubble of the sea-ooze in comparison with against that unspeakable Something in my own soul which makes me know without being able to tell ^how it is or prove ^ how that is I know. If Though I were opposed by what I felt the science linguists and lore of the whole earth deny what I say, it amounts but to this: So it seems to them.—I simply answer, So it seems to me.—The greatest of thoughts and truths, are not never to [illegible] be put in language writing or print..—They are not susceptible of proof like a sum in simple multiplication

I caneven see myself struggling sweating in the fog with the linguists and learned old men.—I look back upon that time in my own days.—I have no gibes nor mocks mockings or laughter;—I have only to be silent and patiently to wait.—


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[Page image: http://www.whitmanarchive.org/manuscripts/figures/duk.00007.001.jpg]




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