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SUGGESTIONS.

1

THAT whatever tastes sweet to the most perfect person
—That is finally right.


2

That the human shape or face is so great, it must never
be made ridiculous;
That for ornaments nothing outr can be allowed,
That anything is most beautiful without ornament;
That exaggerations will be sternly revenged in your
own physiology, and in other persons' physiol-
ogy also;
That clean-shaped children can be jetted and conceiv'd
only where natural forms prevail in public, and
the human face and form are never caricatured;
And that genius need never more be turn'd to ro-
mances.
(For facts properly told, how mean appear all ro-
mances.)


3

I have said many times that materials and the Soul are
great, and that all depends on physique;
Now I reverse what I said, and suggest that all depends
on the sthetic, or intellectual,
And that criticism is great—and that refinement is
greatest of all;
And that the mind governs—and that all depends on
the mind.


4

With one man or woman—(no matter which one—I
even pick out the lowest,)
With him or her I now suggest the whole law;
And that every right, in politics or what-not, shall be
eligible to that one man or woman, on the same
terms as any.


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