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Catalog of the Walt Whitman Literary Manuscripts in The Thomas Biggs Harned Collection of the Library of Congress

Original finding aid completed by the Library of Congress; revised and expanded by The Walt Whitman Archive and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries. Encoded Archival Description completed with the assistance of the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, the University of Nebraska Research Council, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.




Individual items at this repository

  • Whitman Archive Title: Miscellaneous Notes
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00622
  • Box: 2
  • Folder: Undated, Miscellaneous notes or reminders
  • Series: Notes and Memoranda
  • Date: undated
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 4 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: Notes Whitman took concerning ideas or suggestions for poems and other work (for example, "Mr. Goodfellow's suggestions for a pastoral poem"). These notes have no known relationship to Whitman's published work.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Gossip at Dusk
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00367
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Gossip at Dusk
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: undated
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 3 leaves, 4 x 14 to 20 x 12.5 cm, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: Drafts of lines entitled "Gossip at Dusk." The relationship to Whitman's published work is unknown.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Maize-Tassels
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00368
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Maize-Tassels
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: undated
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, 14.5 x 13.5 cm, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A draft of a poem entitled "Maize-Tassels." Written at the top of the manuscript is the note, "White Horse notes." The relationship of this manuscript to Whitman's published work is unknown.

  • Whitman Archive Title: [the strong right]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00369
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: The Strong Right Hand
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: undated
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, 20.5 x 12.5 cm, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A couple of trial lines for an unrealized poem, beginning "the strong right hand." These lines have no known relationship to Whitman's published work.

  • Whitman Archive Title: [Light]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00370
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Untitled and Unidentified
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: undated
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A draft of lines beginning "Light/ Lives, water, light/ and darkness." These lines have no known relationship to Whitman's published work.

  • Whitman Archive Title: [all birth and growth]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00375
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Untitled and Unidentified
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: undated
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 2 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
  • Content: Two scraps of paper held together because of treatment by a collector or archivist. These lines have no known relationship to Whitman's published work.

  • Whitman Archive Title: [Like the young eagle]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00371
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Untitled and Unidentified
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: undated
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 3 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
  • Content: Three scraps of paper held together with draft lines bearing an unknown relationship to Whitman's published work.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Poem incarnating the mind
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00346
  • Box: 2
  • Folder: Notebooks, Before 1855
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: Before 1855
  • Genre: prose, poetry
  • Physical Description: 14 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28
  • Content: Edward Grier dates this notebook before 1855, based on the pronoun revisions from third person to first person and the notebook's similarity to Whitman's early "Talbot Wilson" notebook ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 1:102). Grier notes that a portion of this notebook (beginning "How spied the captain and sailors") describes the wreck of the ship San Francisco in January 1854 (1:108 n33). A note on one of the last pages of the notebook (surface 26) matches the plot of the first of four tales Whitman published as "Some Fact-Romances" in The Aristidean in 1845, so segments of the notebook may have been written as early as the 1840s. Lines from the notebook were used in "Song of Myself" and "A Song of the Rolling Earth," which appeared in the 1856 Leaves of Grass . Language and ideas from the notebook also appear to have contributed to other poems and prose, including "Miracles;" the preface to the 1855 Leaves of Grass ; "The Sleepers," which first appeared as the fourth poem in the 1855 Leaves ; and "A Song of Joys," which appeared as "Poem of Joys" in the 1860 edition.

  • Whitman Archive Title: a schoolmaster
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.04588
  • Box: 2
  • Folder: Notebooks c. 1852?
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: Before or early in 1852
  • Genre: poetry, prose
  • Physical Description: 11 leaves, handwritten; print
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22
  • Content: The plot described in this notebook corresponds to Whitman's novel Life and Adventures of Jack Engle: An Auto-Biography , published serially in the New York Sunday Dispatch from March 14 to April 18, 1852. Two Tribune clippings pasted onto one of the pages of this notebook also are dated 1852. The writing in the notebook therefore probably dates to before or early in 1852. The name of the character "Covert" also appears in Whitman's story "Revenge and Requital; A Tale of a Murderer Escaped," first published in the United States Magazine and Democratic Review in July–August 1845, although the plot of that story bears only minor resemblance to the plot of Jack Engle . Covert, a villainous lawyer in both tales, may have been based on a man from Whitman's own experience. For more about this connection and the composition and publication of Jack Engle , see Zachary Turpin, "Introduction to Walt Whitman's 'Life and Adventures of Jack Engle,'" Walt Whitman Quarterly Review 34 (2017), 225–261. Whitman also copied two excerpts of poetry in this notebook (surface 19). The first poetic quotation comes from Robert Blair's poem "The Grave" (1743). The source of the second quotation is unknown. The note on the verso of what is represented here as the last page of this notebook is upside down, suggesting that Whitman may have begun writing from one direction in this notebook, then flipped it over and started writing in the other direction. The cover of the notebook is labeled "Note Book Walt Whitman 82" in a hand that is not Whitman's.

  • Whitman Archive Title: [Other-Leaves]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.04602
  • Box: 3
  • Folder: Undated, Notebook pages
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1845–1892
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 2 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
  • Content: Notes for a potential work concerning lines and processions, with the words "Other-Leaves/ Dust-and-Spray" at the top.

  • Whitman Archive Title: you know how
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00142
  • Box: 8
  • Folder: Notebooks, [Before 1855]
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: 1855 or before
  • Genre: prose, poetry
  • Physical Description: 14 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28
  • Content: Because it comprises material that Whitman used in the first edition of Leaves of Grass , this notebook must date to sometime before mid-1855.Emory Holloway has posited several connections between passages in this notebook and specific lines in the 1855 edition. Although some of these connections are dubious, the notebook's series of drafts about the effects of music are clearly related to what ultimately became section 26 of "Song of Myself." See Emory Holloway, ed., The Uncollected Poetry and Prose of Walt Whitman (Garden City, New York: Doubleday, Page & Co., 1921), 2:83–86.

  • Whitman Archive Title: of these poems
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.04600
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: Between 1845 and 1860
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A prose manuscript fragment in which Whitman discusses a range of topics, including a discussion, in the third person, of a person who "demands reality in literature." It is unclear if Whitman is referring to himself or to somebody else. Based on the handwriting, Edward Grier dates this manuscript to the 1850s or earlier ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 4:1429). On the verso Whitman has copied two stanzas of English poet William Collins' "The Passions. An Ode for Music."

  • Whitman Archive Title: The analogy
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05176
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: 1855 or earlier
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A manuscript that discusses, in gendered terms, the relationship between the soul and "physical matter," describing the former as male and the latter as female. Although Whitman frequently addresses issues relating to the soul in his poems, there is no direct conncetion between the manuscript and Whitman's published work. Based on the handwriting, Edward Grier dates this manuscript to 1855 or earlier ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 1:176).

  • Whitman Archive Title: For remember that behind all
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05334
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: Between 1845 and 1860
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: Edward Grier notes that this scrap contains ideas similar to those found in what would become section 4 of the poem eventually titled "Song of Myself." But Grier also indicates that the manuscript could be notes for a lecture that Whitman was planning ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 6:2047). In either case, the manuscript likely dates to the 1850s.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Talbot Wilson
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00141
  • Box: 8
  • Folder: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, Notebooks, [1847], (80)
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: Between 1847 and 1854
  • Genre: prose, poetry
  • Physical Description: 66 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133
  • Content: Early discussions of this notebook dated it in the 1840s, and the date associated with it in the Library of Congress finding aid is 1847. The cover of the notebook features a note calling it the "Earliest and Most Important Notebook of Walt Whitman." A note on leaf 27 recto includes the date April 19, 1847, and the year 1847 is listed again as part of a payment note on leaf 43 recto. More recently, however, scholars have argued that Whitman repurposed this notebook, and that most of the writing was more likely from 1853 to 1854, just before the publication of Leaves of Grass . Almost certainly Whitman began the notebook by keeping accounts, producing the figures that are still visible on some of the page stubs, and later returned to it to write the poetry and prose drafts. For further discussion of dating and the fascinating history of this notebook into the twentieth century, see Matt Miller, Collage of Myself: Walt Whitman and the Making of Leaves of Grass (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2010), 2–8. See also Andrew C. Higgins, "Wage Slavery and the Composition of Leaves of Grass : The Talbot Wilson Notebook," Walt Whitman Quarterly Review 20:2 (Fall 2002), 53–77. Scholars have noted a relationship between this notebook and much of the prose and poetry that appeared in the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass . See, for instance, Edward Grier, Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (New York: New York University Press, 1984), 1:53–82. The notebook was lost when Grier published his transcription (based on microfilm). The notebook features an early (if not the earliest) example of Whitman using his characteristic long poetic lines, as well as the "generic or cosmic or transcendental 'I'" that appears in Leaves of Grass (Grier, 1:55).

  • Whitman Archive Title: [What cannot meet all]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05179
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Untitled and Unidentified
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: 1850-1890
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: The recto of this manuscript is a prose jotting with no known relationship to Whitman's published work. On the verso is a draft poem which is partially illegible. The language used here is similar to many poems by Whitman without being clearly linked to any particular poem.

  • Whitman Archive Title: his poem of the
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05619
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Untitled and Unidentified; Undated, on the American Idiom
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: Between 1850 and 1860
  • Genre: poetry, prose
  • Physical Description: 2 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
  • Content: These two scraps once formed part of a larger leaf and contain a crossed-out section of prose that seems to be discussing the human form and its treatment in literature. The phrase "organs and acts," which begins on the first scrap and continues onto the second, is also found in the poem that would eventually be titled "Starting from Paumanok". The poem originally appeared as the first poem in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass , titled "Proto-leaf." It took its final title in the 1867 edition. On the reverse side is a manuscript (loc.05620) containing a draft of an unpublished piece of journalism or essay.

  • Whitman Archive Title: I say that Democracy
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05314
  • Box: 2
  • Folder: Miscellaneous notes or reminders
  • Series: Notes and Memoranda
  • Date: Between 1850 and 1856
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: The writing at the top of this manuscript bears some resemblance to this sentence from the preface to the first edition of Leaves of Grass : "Great genius and the people of these states must never be demeaned to romances" (1855, p. ix). The language and topic also resemble those of Whitman's self-authored review of the 1855 Leaves of Grass , "Walt Whitman and His Poems," which was published in The United States Review in September, 1855. It was also one of several reviews printed separately and included in some copies of the 1855 edition. Edward Grier, in Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts, notes that "the small writing suggests a date in the 1850s" (New York: New York University Press, 1984), 1:361.

  • Whitman Archive Title: List of serviceable
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05211
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Undated, on the American idiom
  • Series: Notes and Memoranda
  • Date: 1850-1856
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: This manuscript contains a short "list of serviceable words from the French" (there are only two words listed: "surveillance" and "prestige").

  • Whitman Archive Title: And to the soul
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05175
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: 1855 or earlier
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A manuscript containing what appear to be three separate prose entries, of varying length and subject matter. The first briefly discusses the soul, the second discusses paper money and the paying of clergymen and congressmen, and the third discusses horses whose eyesight is supposedly affected by the moon. There is no known connection between any of these fragments and Whitman's published work. Edward Grier notes that the paper matches that of a manuscript dated 1855 or earlier, suggesting a similar date for this manuscript ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 1:171).

  • Whitman Archive Title: In Nature all is so real
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05333
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: 1850s
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A manuscript that contrasts the perfection of nature with the imperfection of "religions" and "creeds." There is no known connection between the manuscript and Whitman's published work. Based on the handwriting, Edward Grier dates this manuscript to the 1850s ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 6:2044).

  • Whitman Archive Title: A large, good-looking woman
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05544
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: 1850s
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: Edward Grier postulates that this manuscript was probably written in the 1850s. The identity of the "large, good-looking woman" and the source of the story about Tom Thumb are unknown, though Grier notes that Whitman interviewed P. T. Barnum in 1847, Thumb visited the Midwest with Barnum's circus after 1851, and Thumb made an 1854 appearance with the circus in Brooklyn. For further details, see Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (New York: New York University Press, 1984), 1:244. It is possible that this may have been draft fragments or notes toward intended pieces of fiction.

  • Whitman Archive Title: human feet, awaits us
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05625
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: Before or early in 1855
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: The content of this manuscript, in which Whitman writes that true knowledge and experience do not come from books, is similar to material found in Whitman's early notebooks and in the first edition of Leaves of Grass. Based on this and the handwriting, Edward Grier dates this manuscript to before or early in 1855 ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 1:188).

  • Whitman Archive Title: for lect on Literature
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05629
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: 1850s or 1860s
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: Whitman's heading indicates that these brief notes were intended for a lecture on "Literature" or "Democracy." The notes contain only two short lines, both about "literary men." Based on the handwriting, Edward Grier dates this manuscript to the 1850s ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 4:1591). This date can be supported by Whitman's interest in oratory and goal of becoming a lecturer in the 1850s, though he also maintained these interests in the 1860s. He explained in a letter to his mother of June 9, 1863: "I think something of commencing a series of lectures & readings &c. through different cities of the north, to supply myself with funds for my Hospital & Soldiers visits." Whitman's meditation on literature and its relation to "Democracy" in this manuscript may have contributed to his essay "Democracy," which appeared in the Galaxy in 1867 and was later incorporated into Democratic Vistas (1871).

  • Whitman Archive Title: Names or terms
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05640
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: 1850s
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A manuscript in which Whitman discusses false meanings being applied to words, "as the term calling the American aborigines Indians ." Based on the handwriting, Edward Grier dates this manuscript to the 1850s ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 5:1664).

  • Whitman Archive Title: truly what is commonest
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05641
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: Before or early in 1855
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: The words that appear near the beginning of this scrap are similar to a line from "Song of Myself," in which Whitman writes "What is commonest and cheapest and nearest and easiest is Me." Thus, it is likely that this manuscript dates from before or early in 1855.

  • Whitman Archive Title: The regular old followers
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00024
  • Box: 2
  • Folder: Notebooks c. 1854–1855
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: Between 1853 and 1855
  • Genre: poetry, prose
  • Physical Description: 12 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24
  • Content: Whitman likely wrote the building specifications on what is presented here as the last leaf of this notebook first, and then flipped the notebook over and wrote notes from the other direction. References to the San Francisco can be dated to sometime after January 1854. The cover of the notebook is labeled "Note Book Walt Whitman" in a hand that is not Whitman's. Selections and subjects from this notebook were used in the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass , including phrases from the poems that would later be titled "Song of Myself" and "Song of the Answerer." See Edward Grier, Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (New York: New York University Press, 1984), 1:113–117. Lines in this manuscript correspond to a line from the manuscript poem, unpublished in Whitman's lifetime, titled "Pictures": "And now a merry recruiter passes, with fife and drum, seeking who will join his troop." The first several lines of the poem (not including this line) were revised and published in The American in October 1880 as "My Picture-Gallery," a poem later included in Leaves of Grass as part of the "Autumn Rivulets" cluster (1881, p. 310).

  • Whitman Archive Title: The idea of reconciliation
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05180
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: [Before 1882], "The Tramp and Strike Questions"
  • Series: Notes and Memoranda
  • Date: Between 1854 and 1860
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A version of the second paragraph of this manuscript appears toward the end of the preface to the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass >: "No great literature nor any like style of behaviour or oratory or social intercourse or household arrangements or public institutions or the treatment by bosses of employed people, nor executive detail or detail of the army or navy, nor spirit of legislation or courts or police or tuition or architecture or songs or amusements or the costumes of young men, can long elude the jealous and passionate instinct of American standards" (xii). Edward Grier dates the manuscript after 1857 because it is written on the reverse of a City of Williamsburgh tax form ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 1:400). Scholars, following Fredson Bowers, have generally assumed that Whitman used the Williamsburgh tax forms from 1857 to 1860, while he was working at the Brooklyn Daily Times . The city of Williamsburgh was incorporated with Brooklyn effective January 1855, so the forms would have been obsolete after that date ( Whitman's Manuscripts: Leaves of Grass [1860] [Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1955], xli–xliii). Most of the manuscripts Whitman wrote on the tax forms can be dated to the late 1850s. Bowers also notes, however, that Whitman may have used the forms over a considerable span of time, and that "it is not impossible that Whitman had picked up these tax forms for scrap paper at Rome Brothers at some unknown date in 1854 or early 1855, or later" (xliii). At least two of the tax forms Whitman used were dated 1854 (see, for instance, "Vast national tracts"), but as Grier points out, this may not correspond to the date of Whitman's writing (5:1946). Whitman may have found a stack of obsolete Williamsburgh forms in 1857 that included discarded draft forms dated earlier. Although this manuscript matches wording in the preface to the 1855 edition, Whitman copied out sections of the preface in several later manuscripts, and the revision from "much longer" to "permanently" suggests that here Whitman may have been revising away from the preface version here as well. The manuscript is thus difficult to date conclusively, but it was almost certainly written after 1854 and probably before 1860.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Autobiographical Data
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05935
  • Box: 6
  • Folder: Notebooks [before 1855]
  • Series: Photocopies
  • Date: Between 1848 and 1856
  • Genre: prose, poetry
  • Physical Description: 10 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10
  • Content: Photostats, made for William L. Finkel sometime "prior to 1942," of a notebook then in the collection but lost during World War II. Partial transcriptions, done by Emory Holloway and Clifton Furness in the 1920s, indicate that the photostats, which show sixteen full pages and portions of four others, are an incomplete representation of the original. Neither the photostats nor extant transcriptions bear any definitive evidence for dating the notebook, but scholars have generally agreed that Whitman must have written its contents around the time of the publication of the first edition of Leaves of Grass in 1855. Ed Folsom has noted a connection between a passage shown on the right side of the fourth image and the account of the "mash'd fireman" in "Song of Myself." See Folsom, "Erasing Race: The Lost Black Presence in Whitman's Manuscripts," in Whitman Noir: Black America and the Good Gray Poet (Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2014), 3–31.

  • Whitman Archive Title: women
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05589
  • Box: 7
  • Folder: Photocopies Notebooks [before 1855]
  • Series: Supplementary Papers
  • Date: Between about 1854 and 1860
  • Genre: prose, poetry
  • Physical Description: 31 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61
  • Content: This notebook, now lost, contains much draft material used in the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass , in addition to a few images and phrasings that Whitman used in the second (1856) and third (1860) editions. As the folder title indicates, the notebook is currently represented by photocopied images of each page derived, apparently, from a microfilm of the original that was made in the 1930s prior to the notebook's disappearance from the collection during World War II. As Floyd Stovall has noted, the few datable references in this notebook (e.g., the fighting at Sebastopol during the Crimean War) are to events from about 1853 to late 1854, shortly before the first publication of Leaves of Grass . See Stovall, "Dating Whitman's Early Notebooks," Studies in Bibliography 24 (1971), 197–204. See also Edward Grier, Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (New York: New York University Press, 1984), 1:138–155. Surfaces 9, 10, 54, and 55 bear passages that probably contributed to the first poem of the 1855 edition, eventually titled "Song of Myself," and other material, on surfaces 26, 46, 51, 54, and 58, is clearly linked to the evolution of that poem. A passage on surface 23 is also perhaps related to its development. Surfaces 11 and 12 both have material probably used as fodder for the poem "Song of the Answerer," first published as the seventh poem in the 1855 Leaves. A brief passage on surface 12 possibly contributed to the poem first published in 1860 as the fourth of the "Chants Democratic" and later retitled "Our Old Feuillage." Surfaces 13 and 46 contain drafts of passages used in the second poem of 1855, later titled "A Song for Occupations." Material on surfaces 24 and 47 probably also contributed to this poem. Passages on surfaces 17, 18, 40, 42, and 45 are likely early drafts toward lines used in "Poem of the Sayers of the Words of the Earth" (1856), which later became "A Song of the Rolling Earth." Surface 18 also bears writing probably related to the twelfth and final poem of the 1855 Leaves, later titled "Faces." On surfaces 18, 24, and 51 are lines that might represent draft material toward "I Sing the Body Electric" (first published as the fifth poem of the 1855 Leaves ). Other passages, on surfaces 47 and 55, are likely related to that poem; those on surfaces 36, 37, 44, 45, and 47 are certainly related. Ideas and images written on surfaces 20 and 46 are likely related to the poem "Song of the Open Road," which first appeared as "Poem of the Road," and a passage on surface 24 may also be related. Two passages on surface 21 were used in the tenth poem of the 1855 Leaves of Grass, later titled "There Was a Child Went Forth." Surface 22 contains writing probably used in "Sun-Down Poem" (1856), titled "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" in later editions. Some of the writing on surface 24 might also have contributed to the development of that poem. Another passage on surface 22, as well as passages on surfaces 26, 47, and 60, are possibly related to the 1855 Preface. A different passage on surface 60 is clearly related to the Preface, and a passage on surface 45 is likely related to it. Two of the draft lines of poetry on surface 31 were used in the untitled third poem of the "Debris" cluster in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass. This poem was retitled "Leaflets" in 1867 and dropped from subsequent editions. The writing on surface 41 contributed to the 1856 "Poem of Salutation," which was eventually titled "Salut au Monde!" The jotting at the top of surface 43 is also likely connected to this poem.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Vast national tracts
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05354
  • Series: Recovered Cardboard Butterfly and Notebooks, [1847]-[circa 1863-1864]
  • Date: Between 1854 and 1860
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 2 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
  • Content: The first manuscript leaf is written on the back of a City of Williamsburgh tax form, filled out and dated 1854. The second leaf is written on the back of a Brooklyn election form, which includes the printed digits "185" but has not been filled out with the specific year. Scholars, following Fredson Bowers, have generally assumed that Whitman used the Williamsburgh tax forms from 1857 to 1860, while he was working at the Brooklyn Daily Times . The city of Williamsburgh was incorporated with Brooklyn effective January 1855, so the forms would have been obsolete after that date ( Whitman's Manuscripts: Leaves of Grass [1860] [Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1955], xli–xliii). Most of the manuscripts Whitman wrote on the tax forms can be dated to the late 1850s. Bowers also notes, however, that Whitman may have used the forms over a considerable span of time, and that "it is not impossible that Whitman had picked up these tax forms for scrap paper at Rome Brothers at some unknown date in 1854 or early 1855, or later" (xliii). As Edward Grier points out, the date on the tax forms may not correspond to the date of Whitman's writing ( Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984], 5:1946). Whitman may have found a stack of obsolete Williamsburgh forms in 1857 that included discarded draft forms dated earlier. Whitman saw something of the plains on his journey to and from New Orleans in 1848, and his most extensive trip through the west was to Denver in 1879, but he collected newspaper articles about the west throughout the 1850s, 60s, and 70s (Ed Folsom, "Walt Whitman and the Prairies," Mickle Street Review 17/18 [2005]). The manuscript is thus difficult to date conclusively, but it was almost certainly written after 1854 and probably before 1860.

  • Whitman Archive Title: The appearance
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05302
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Spectacle Inside the Opera House
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: 1890-1891
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 3 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
  • Content: This item appears to be a fragmentary, earlier draft of "A Visit to the Opera," a manuscript article now at Huntington Library in San Marino, California. No published version of the article has been found, though both manuscripts bear some similarities with a piece that Whitman published in Life Illustrated on November 10, 1855, entitled "The Opera." Edward Grier, in his discussion of these and other related manuscripts, speculates that the manuscripts represent a revision of the published article, which Whitman perhaps submitted for publication sometime after late 1858. (See Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984] 1:388-397.)

  • Whitman Archive Title: The Amadis of Gaul
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05546
  • Box: 3
  • Folder: Undated
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1855-1871
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 11 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22
  • Content: These notes served as background for Whitman's discussion of current popular American literature in Democratic Vistas (1871), where he speculates that it is an inheritance of "the Amadises and Palmerins."

  • Whitman Archive Title: Henry VII died 1509
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05548
  • Box: 3
  • Folder: Undated
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1855-1882
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 3 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
  • Content: The brutality of the reign of Henry VIII and the English Reformation is evident in the section of Specimen Days and Collect (1882-1883) entitled "Origins of Attempted Secession."

  • Whitman Archive Title: [How will it do for figure?]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00372
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: on slavery
  • Series: Notes and Memoranda
  • Date: about 1856
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: Notes and draft lines of a work concerning slavery. The relationship of these lines to Whitman's published work is unknown. On the verso is a page from the November, 1856 Christian Examiner .

  • Whitman Archive Title: paths of rhyme
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05618
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: Untitled and Unidentified
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: 1857-1881
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: The sentiments about the poet and versification are present in the revised "Preface, 1855, to first issue of 'Leaves of Grass,'" published in Specimen Days & Collect (1882-1883). Grier dates this scrap from 1857, and the verso has a printed date of 185-.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Notebook Walt Whitman
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05080
  • Box: 2-3
  • Folder: New York City notebook
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1857-1861
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 22 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44
  • Content: Two surfaces (number 27 and 29) of this manuscript notebook contain notes on the Old Military Garden in New York City that Whitman used for the article "An Old Brooklyn Landmark Going," published in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle on 10 October 1861, page 2. For the full transcription and images of the article, see http://www.whitmanarchive.org/published/periodical/journalism/tei/per.00207.html

  • Whitman Archive Title: Notebook Walt Whitman
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00348
  • Box: 2-3
  • Folder: New York City notebook
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1857-1862
  • Genre: prose, poetry
  • Physical Description: 32 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64
  • Content: This notebook includes a draft of lines written about Pfaff's, a popular mid-nineteenth century Bohemian spot (see surfaces 11 through 18). The lines were edited and published posthumously as "The Two Vaults." This notebook also contains the notes (see surfaces 23 to 44 and 47 to 59) about the Jamaica Presbyterian bicentennial which were used by Whitman in the article "Important Ecclesiastical Gathering at Jamaica, L.I." published in the Brooklyn City News in January 1862.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Notebook, 1860-1861
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00029
  • Box: 2
  • Folder: Notebooks, 1860-1861
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1860-1861
  • Genre: prose, poetry
  • Physical Description: 61 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118
  • Content: An early notebook with several notes for poem ideas, trial lines, addresses, and drawings. Material in this notebook relates to poems ultimately titled "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking," "By Blue Ontario's Shore," "The City Dead-House," and "Chanting the Square Deific." Some of the trial verses in this notebook were published posthumously as "[I Stand and Look]," "Ship of Libertad," and "Of My Poems." Within the notebook is also a poem draft that Whitman has titled called "The Incomplete."

  • Whitman Archive Title: Note Book
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.04605
  • Box: 2
  • Folder: [1860], Boston notebook
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1860
  • Genre: prose, poetry
  • Physical Description: 34 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56
  • Content: A notebook from Whitman's trip to Boston in March through May of 1860. While most of the notebook is devoted to names, addresses, and notes from his visit, the first two leaves (surfaces 3 and 4) contain notes related to the printing of the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass , which he was in Boston to oversee. The printing notes refer to possible ornamentations for specific pages of Leaves and reference other books as examples of possible ornamentation and typography. Edward Grier provides information about the specific books that Whitman mentions, noting similarities between them and Leaves ( Notebook and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts [New York: New York University Press, 1984] 1:419-421). Images of blank versos for several of the pages are currently unavailable.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Life light and
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.04601
  • Box: 3
  • Folder: Notebook pages
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1860-1867
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 2 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A manuscript that contains various poetic lines. The line on the second leaf that describes "the Steamship . . . and the trailing pennant of smoke" was incorporated, in a slightly altered form, into the 1867 version of the poem that would eventually be titled "Song of Myself." The line was retained in all subsequent versions of the poem. The connection of the rest of the lines to Whitman's published work is unknown. The versos of both leaves are currently unavailable.

  • Whitman Archive Title: [O a new song]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00103
  • Box: 4
  • Folder: Newspaper Clippings on the Civil War
  • Series: Newspaper Clippings on the Civil War
  • Date: about 1861
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten; printed
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3
  • Content: A manuscript fragment containing the first two partial lines of the poem "Song of the Banner at Daybreak" first published in 1861 as "Banner at day-Break". The fragment has been pasted to a larger sheet making the verso unavailable.

  • Whitman Archive Title: [Surgeons operating]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00080
  • Box: 1
  • Folder: A March in the Ranks Hard Prest
  • Series: Manuscripts
  • Date: about 1865
  • Genre: poetry, prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, 21 cm x 16.5 cm, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: A clean, late draft of lines published in the poem "A March in the Ranks Hard-Prest, and the Road Unknown," first published in 1865. On the verso are prose notes about various corps of Civil War soldiers.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Voltaire's readable
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05315
  • Box: 2
  • Folder: Miscellaneous notes or reminders
  • Series: Notes and Memoranda
  • Date: 1860-1888
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: This scrap can be linked to the article "George Fox and Shakspere" in the section entitled "Elias Hicks" in November Boughs , published 1888. Whitman is referring to a translation of Voltaire's Philosophical Dictionary (Boston: J. P. Mendum, 1852), where the passage on pages 197-198 clearly discusses Quakers or "primitives."

  • Whitman Archive Title: Brooklyn & Washington Notebook
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.04604
  • Box: 2
  • Folder: [1860-1864], Brooklyn and Washington notebook
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1860-1875
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 33 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64
  • Content: This notebook contains, among other things, miscellaneous notes on soldiers met by Whitman in his visits to the hospitals. The name of soldier Reuben Farwell appears twice (on surface number six and surface number ten) and that of soldier Bethuel Smith appears once (on surface number ten). Whitman mentions these two soldiers in "Typical Soldiers," which first appeared in the "Notes" section of Memoranda During the War (1875–1876), later revised for Specimen Days & Collect (1882–1883) and reprinted in Complete Prose Works (1892). Notes addressing themes for potential poems appear in this notebook as well (see surfaces 32 through 36). The relationship of these notes to Whitman's published poetry is unknown.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Notebook, 1868-1870
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00350
  • Box: 6
  • Folder: Notebook, 1868-1870
  • Series: Lincoln Material
  • Date: about 1868-1870
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 8 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16
  • Content: A notebook (probably bound by someone other than Whitman), containing some draft lines (one titled "Epictetus," another "After an Extract from Heine's Diary") that bear an unknown relationship to Whitman's published work. Also included are several notes that scholars have identified as autobiographical comments on Whitman's relationship with Peter Doyle.

  • Whitman Archive Title: For an idea
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00070
  • Box: 6
  • Folder: Lincoln Material Poetry Manuscripts "The Crusades" [1869?]
  • Series: Lincoln Material
  • Date: about 1868-1870
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: One of several manuscripts in which Whitman records and develops ideas for a poem that never emerged about the crusades. In this manuscript, Whitman relates "the Crusades" and "our own great war" through the observation that great revolutions have "been mainly for an idea." Whitman mentions the crusades specifically in both his prose works Specimen Days & Collect (1882–1883) and Democratic Vistas (1871), though a direct link between these manuscript notes and any of his published works is unclear. The verso contains part of a cancelled letter about the steamer Georgia between Charles Francis Adams, Minister to England during the Civil War, and Earl Russell, British Foreign Minister. Other dated materials containing notes on the crusades suggest this manuscript was likely composed around 1869.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Crusades
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00066
  • Box: 6
  • Folder: Lincoln Material Poetry Manuscripts "The Crusades" [1869?]
  • Series: Lincoln Material
  • Date: about 1868-1870
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: This manuscript bears trial lines for a poem attempting to link the crusades to America. While other manuscripts and published works share similarities in topic and idea, a direct link to any published document is unknown. The verso contains a cancelled list of references to letters in the House Executive Documents, 38th Cong. which correspond to several individual documents transcribed on the cancelled versos of other crusade manuscripts also in the Harned collection. Other dated materials containing notes on the crusades suggest this manuscript was likely composed around 1869.

  • Whitman Archive Title: [The number of the Crusades is]
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.00071
  • Box: 6
  • Folder: Lincoln Material Poetry Manuscripts "The Crusades" [1869?]
  • Series: Lincoln Material
  • Date: about 1868-1870
  • Genre: poetry
  • Physical Description: 1 leaf, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2
  • Content: One of several manuscripts in which Whitman records and develops ideas for a poem that never emerged about the crusades. This manuscript contains notes about the time periods and divides between the crusades. While other manuscripts and published works share similarities in topic and idea, a direct link is unknown. The verso contains part of a cancelled letter about the steamer Georgia between Charles Francis Adams, Minister to England during the Civil War, and Earl Russell, British Foreign Minister. Other dated materials containing notes on the crusades suggest this manuscript was likely composed around 1869.

  • Whitman Archive Title: Dr. L B Russell
  • Whitman Archive ID: loc.05449
  • Box: 2-3
  • Folder: Diary
  • Series: Notebooks
  • Date: 1862-1863
  • Genre: prose
  • Physical Description: 43 leaves, handwritten
  • View Images: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87
  • Content: This manuscript notebook contains a series of diary entries from December 1862 to December 1863. In the entries, Whitman keeps track of family correspondence and of how he spent his days. He often mentions visiting wounded and dying soldiers in Washington military hospitals. While the whole notebook adds context to Whitman's writings about the Civil War, there are two entries that can be directly linked to specific passages in Whitman's published work. The entry from Monday, May 4th, 1863 (surface 12) mentions "4th Hooker's battles around Fredericksburg to night the wounded begin to arrive from Hooker's command." This passage contributes to the section "The Wounded from Chancellorsville" published in Specimen Days & Collect (1882-1883) and retained in Complete Prose Works (1892). The entry from Wednesday, September 16th, 1863 (surface number thirty-one), reporting the death of Lorenzo Strong, contributes to "Last of the War Cases" published in November Boughs (1888) and later retained in Complete Prose Works (1892).

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